Twitch ‘disenchanted’ with music publishing trade because it’s hit with 1,000 copyright infringement claims

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The live streaming platform Twitch, which is owned by Amazon, announced its users on Friday (28.

The company sent out an email stating that these new DMCA deactivation notifications contained “approximately 1,000 individual claims” about the use of copyrighted music played in the background of recorded VODs (on-demand video).

In the email sent to users on Friday, shared on Twitter by journalist Rod Breslau, Twitch stated that “this is our first such contact from the music publishing industry”.

It added: “[We] are disappointed that they decided to send takedowns when we were ready and willing to talk to them about solutions ”.

Twitch states that music publishers have used automated tools to identify the copyrighted music in their users’ clips and expects there will likely be more opt-out notices.

This new round of DMCA opt-out requests follows on October’s news that “thousands” of videos were deleted from Twitch due to violations.

The platform is required by law to comply with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) deactivation request made by rights holders (e.g. a record company) or by a legal entity on behalf of a rights holder such as the RIAA in order to be protected under US American Safe Harbor laws and is not liable for the violation of user-generated content on its platform.

“This is our first such contact in the music publishing industry (there can be multiple owners for a single piece of music) and we are disappointed that they decided to send takedowns when we were ready and willing to talk to them about solutions. “

Pull out

The October bulk deletion came after news in June that a number of prominent Twitch users had received copyright infringement from the platform for music used in clips posted on its channels the previous year, with the company threatening to terminate the accounts from “repeat” to terminate infringers. “

The following month, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos told the House Justice Committee at an antitrust hearing that he did not know whether Twitch had licensed his music or not.

In November, Twitch apologized for the copyright issues it had encountered on its platform, saying in a swamp post that “we have done our best over the past few months to deal with this situation on behalf of the rights holders and creators.”

It added, “One of the mistakes we made was not creating appropriate tools that developers could use to manage their own VOD and clip libraries.”

In March, the website added tools to make it easier for users to manage opt-out requests and delete clips to avoid warnings against their channels.

As noted by The Verge, the latest deactivation reports are likely to worry the streamers involved in the deactivations in June and October last year.

That’s because Twitch’s policy states that repeated copyright infringement will result in “perpetual suspension” of accounts.

Twitch offers licensed music through its Soundtrack by Twitch tool, which launched in September following agreements with a number of global distributors and a handful of indie labels from around the world.

However, Twitch’s Soundtrack is licensed for live streaming only, and not for on-demand video.

Twitch said in its email on Friday, “We aim to be more transparent with you about DMCA. We recently received a number of DMCA deactivation notifications with approximately 1,000 individual claims from music publishers.

“All claims apply to the VODs and the vast majority of streamers who hear background music while playing video games or streaming IRL.

Twitch added, “Based on the number of claims, we believe these rightsholders used automated tools to scan and identify copyrighted music in the creators’ VODs and clips, which means they will likely send further notifications.

“We are actively talking to music labels about solutions that could work for both creators and rights holders.

“This is our first such contact from the music publishing industry (there can be multiple owners for a single piece of music) and we are disappointed that they decided to send takedowns when we were ready and willing to talk to them about solutions. “Music business worldwide

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