Paradise launches government-backed TRIDES challenge in Germany to determine ‘unknown audio content material’ – and get creators paid

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Paradise Worldwide, headquartered in Berlin, started in 2009 as a distributor and digital service provider for independent artists and labels. She then expanded her offering to include music publishing services – including direct negotiations with collecting societies and DSPs. And then it also became a debt collection agency for neighbor rights.

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More recently, Paradise has focused on expanding these offerings to exciting, rapidly developing markets such as Latin America and Africa. However, the company believes its latest launch could be the most transformative yet.

Paradise’s new audio recognition data tool, TRIDES (Track Recognition in the Digital Ecosystem) was developed in cooperation with the (and partially financed) Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy.

The ambitious platform builds on Paradise’s longstanding relationship with leading audio recognition technology providers, said Ralph Boege, managing director of Paradise.

While TRIDES emulates some of the best aspects of these services, the platform also aims to do more – both for Paradise itself and for future industry partners, including rightsholders and PROs.

“The funding from the federal government comes with a clear mandate that this should be a solution for rights holders, including independents.”

Ralph Böge, paradise

“Our experience with third-party audio recognition services has been okay, but in the end we are always disappointed with the data reports we and our independent customers are getting back,” Boege told MBW.

“The goal of TRIDES is to integrate everyone into the music industry and not have any gaps [in data]. The funding from the German government comes with a clear mandate that this should be a solution for rights holders, including independents. We have a process, a technology and an API that work. “

Boege believes that an important differentiator for TRIDES, especially among the independent labels and artists, will be the sensible data exchange model.

“The fees are so high to get data back [from some existing audio recognition services], it could ruin some small labels, ”he argues. “Restoring this data should be a mandatory condition for these labels to allow this [said services] to use their data at all. “

He adds: “Whether artists or labels come from Kenya, Mexico, Sweden, the USA or Germany, access to industry-standard data should be available to everyone – and that is our goal.”

Certain industry associations are already trying to use ISRC code databases to help eliminate inconsistencies in data synchronization in music, but Boege is skeptical.

“Whether an artist or a label comes from Kenya, Mexico, Sweden, the USA or Germany, access to data that is customary in the industry should be available to everyone.”

Ralph Böge, paradise

Prior to Paradise, he says he worked at independent labels and publishers, where he recalls that ISRC data entries were tampered with by employees who did not treat it as a priority – something he believes has been commonplace in global business for decades becomes.

“Modern industry has to rely on unique data that it can trust, and the only way to get that data is through audio fingerprinting,” he says. “As a result, the industry needs to shift its focus to audio and invest in a database designed to create unique audio fingerprints. It won’t get any better until then. “

He adds, “Today some collecting societies can’t do the job [of data matching] because they don’t have a proper data model that allows them to match even the rudimentary track title and then report and distribute the revenue to the correct independent rights holder.

“TRIDES exists because we knew that we couldn’t complain about this situation all the time – it doesn’t do any good. Someone has to deliver an industry solution, so that’s what we do. “

According to Paradise, TRIDES, which is still in beta, is already enabling the company to “better identify unknown audio, DJ mixes and podcasts,” which in turn will help reduce part of two “black boxes” of unrecovered royalties to win: (i) missing payments for mechanical rights from DSPs; and (ii) failure to pay for the use of recorded music by broadcasters and public service corporations around the world (ie, related rights).

If the money in one of these “black boxes” is not claimed by independent rights holders for several years, says Boege, the money not collected will flow back to the largest players in the music industry through market share-based blind payments.

How big is the problem of the “black box” worldwide? Note that in the United States earlier this year, DSPs paid approximately $ 424 million in retrospective unclaimed royalties to the Mechanical Licensing Collective (MLC), whose job it is to pass that money on to the right copyright holders.

Paradise looks into the distance. It expects its TRIDES technology to be groundbreaking in areas like Africa, where the company first signed direct license agreements with a number of DSPs in 2020.

“The industry needs to shift its focus to audio and invest in a database designed to create unique audio fingerprints. It won’t get any better until then. “

Ralph Böge, paradise

Paradise’s core business of distribution includes over 250,000 recordings for indie labels and artists.

The company has now fed the full range of its copyright data for worldwide distribution and music publishing into TRIDES and relied on its music recognition process to cleanse its data – and the resulting claims for unpaid license fees.

“The constantly changing music industry still has problems with revenue distribution,” says Boege.

“Paradise Worldwide believes that combining all capture tasks with the ultimate goal of accurate reporting based on the latest technology available is the way to go.”Music business worldwide

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