UK music trade physique slams ‘retrograde’ authorities report on systemic racism in Britain

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UK Music, the trade organization representing multiple sectors of the UK music industry, has released a new government-sponsored report released by the UK Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparity (CRED).

The CRED report, released last month, looked at racial and ethnic differences in the UK and made a number of recommendations on the matter to the UK government.

This included “building trust between different communities and the institutions that serve them” and getting rid of the demographic acronym BAME (which stands for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic).

The CRED chairman, Dr. Tony Sewell CBE, however, summarized some more controversial findings in a foreword which reads: “Simply put, we are no longer seeing a UK where the system is deliberately directed against ethnic minorities.

“The barriers and differences are there, they are many and, ironically, very few of them are directly related to racism.

“Simply put, we no longer see a UK where the system is deliberately directed against ethnic minorities.”

Dr. Tony Sewell writes in the Report of the Commission on Racial and Ethnic Differences

“Too often, ‘racism’ is the collective declaration and can simply be implicitly accepted and not explored explicitly.”

Such conclusions have disappointed UK music, which represents sectors such as the UK music recording, live music and music publishing sectors under a single umbrella organization.

The panel said in a statement: “We are disappointed with the content of the Commission’s report on race and ethnic differences. The report does not go far enough to recognize the extent of structural and systemic racism.

“There is indeed systemic racism in the UK. Our diversity data prove this. We must properly acknowledge its existence in the context of the real experience of ethnic communities in order to take action. “

Paulette Long, UK Music Diversity Taskforce

“There are missed opportunities not to make ethnic wage differentials a legal requirement. The report also missed the opportunity to adequately reflect the experiences of ethnically diverse communities in the music industry and in society at large.

“We believe that much more can and should be done to combat racism and promote diversity and inclusion.”

UK Music refers to its own ten-point plan developed by the Diversity Taskforce and published in 2020.

Paulette Long OBE, Vice Chair of the UK Music Diversity Taskforce, said: “It was extremely important that UK Music, its members and the Diversity Taskforce come together to make this statement public and to be very clear about our position on the areas of the CRED report that we felt disappointed.

“There is indeed systemic racism in the UK. Our diversity data prove this. We need to adequately recognize its existence in the context of the real experience of ethnic communities in order to take action and respond through accountability and investment. Denying its existence is just not acceptable.

“As a creative sector, the music industry needs to do as much as possible to reduce racism and systemic inequality and to do so with speed.”

“The government’s CRED report has taken a huge step backwards and fundamentally misses the opportunity to fight racism, inequality and injustice.”

Ammunition Talwar, UK Music Diversity Task Force

Ammo Talwar MBE, Chair of the UK Music Diversity Taskforce, commented, “The government’s CRED report has taken a huge step backwards and is a fundamentally missed opportunity to address racism, inequality and injustice. The UK Music Statement outlines these missed opportunities and calls on the government to take concerted action to bring about real lasting change.

“The UK’s Music Diversity Taskforce has a clear deployment plan that we hope will pave the way for other organizations and other sectors and make the changes necessary to truly represent and support the communities and audiences we serve .

“Our evidence and findings in the Diversity Report were clear – we have problems with systemic racism in the music industry and our ten-point plan hopes to address some of these problems with metrics, but also with respect and values.”Music business worldwide

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